NYS DEC announces opening of central-finger lakes segment of birding trail

NYS DEC announces opening of central-finger lakes segment of birding trail

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced opening of central-finger lakes segment of nationwide birding trail.

This was disclosed in statement on Tuesday May 2, 2022, by DEC Commissioner, Basil Seggos.

According to the statement, the grand opening will highlight the state’s world-class and wide-ranging birding opportunities. 

The Central-Finger Lakes segment includes 54 locations throughout 15 counties, providing a variety of quality birding experiences for New Yorkers and visitors to enjoy.

"With the annual bird migration and the wide variety of species coming to the region, Spring is truly a perfect time of year to visit any of the 54 locations on the newest segment of the New York State Birding Trail," Commissioner Seggos said. 

“The Central-Finger Lakes region brings together many partners to provide a curated birding experience for both expert birders and New Yorkers new to this fun and accessible activity.”

Birdwatching has quickly become one of New York’s fastest-growing recreation and tourism activities. 

DEC manages the New York State Birding Trail in collaboration with partners that include the Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. 

The statewide trail network includes promoted birding locations that can be accessed by car or public transportation, providing an inclusive experience for all visitors to enjoy birds amid beautiful natural settings with little or no cost or investment in equipment.

State Parks Commissioner Erik Kulleseid said, “With the opening of the Central-Finger Lakes segment of the New York State Birding Trail, our visitors can discover some of the prime bird watching areas of the state, allowing for a greater connection to nature and outdoor recreation. 

"The trail includes 17 State Park facilities in the Central-Finger Lakes Region with nearly 30 different designated sites.”

Each spring, hundreds of thousands of geese and ducks of some two dozen species migrate through this region on the Atlantic flyway.