National Black Church Initiative Is Asking The FDA To Temporally Ban E-cigarette In Light Of The Six Recent Deaths

National Black Church Initiative Is Asking The FDA To Temporally Ban  E-cigarette In Light Of The Six Recent Deaths
Black People should Stop Vaping

Washington, DC – The National Black Church Initiative (NBCI), a faith-based coalition of 34,000 member churches comprised of 15 denominations and 25.7 million African Americans have asked the FDA to temporarily ban e-cigarette in light of the recent deaths.

Rev. Anthony Evans, President of the National Black Church Initiative says, “NBCI urged its members to stop vaping over a year ago, we are warning how long would it takes the FDA to issue a ban. They are moving very slow on these issues”

According to media reports, health officials are investigating more than 450 potential cases of pulmonary illness in the U.S. related to vaping and e-cigarette products. Six deaths have been associated with the illness. The latest death, reported Tuesday, was a Kansas resident over the age of 50, the state’s health department said.

Many doctors and health officials are urging people to stop vaping during the investigation. Here is what health officials know so far about the condition:

The federal investigation into the link between vaping and severe lung illnesses is ongoing and has not identified a cause, but all reported cases have indicated the use of e-cigarette products and some patients have reported using e-cigarettes containing cannabinoid products, such as THC.

There are also separate investigations being conducted in separate states.

New York health officials said last week that extremely high levels of the chemical vitamin E acetate was found in nearly all cannabis-containing vaping products that were analyzed as part of the investigation. At least one vape product containing this chemical has been linked to each person who fell ill and submitted a product for testing in the state.

Laboratory tests conducted at the New York State Department of Health's Wadsworth Center in Albany showed "very high levels" of vitamin E acetate in the cannabis-containing samples, the state health department announced.